sábado, 5 de agosto de 2017

ALIKE, THE STORY OF COPI & PASTE

ALIKE, THE STORY OF COPI & PASTE


"Alike" is an animated short film directed by Daniel Martínez Lara & Rafa Cano Méndez. In a busy life, Copi is a father who tries to teach the right way to his son, Paste. But...what is the correct path?


Watch the video and answer the questions below


QUESTIONS


How are colours used in this short movie? What do they symbolize?


What is Paste, the son,  like at the beginning of the story? 
How does he change little by little? Why?


Does Copi, the father, change in the story? When? How? Why?


What is the main topic of this short movie? What's its message? 


How did you feel while watching? What's your favourite moment in the story?
 Did you like it? Why? Why not?













***Note to teachers***

You'll find a detailed lesson plan for this movie HERE

via learnonline

viernes, 21 de julio de 2017

WILL: 21st CENTURY SHAKESPEARE

WILL: 21st CENTURY SHAKESPEARE

Jamie Campbell Bower and Laurie Davidson as Christopher Marlowe and William Shakespeare in TNT drama series

William Shakespeare is one of the most widely known authors in the world and in history,  but we actually know very little about the man. For instance, we know very little about his life during two major spans of time, commonly referred to as the "lost years": 1578-82 and 1585-92. The first period covers the time after Shakespeare left grammar school, until his marriage to Anne Hathaway in November of 1582. The second period covers the seven years of Shakespeare's life in which he must have been perfecting his dramatic skills and collecting sources for the plots of his plays.  The TV series “WILL”, which premiered on TNT on 10th July 2017, in a very imaginative way, tries to fill in the seven years’ gap. 

WILL tells the wild story of young William Shakespeare's  arrival onto the punk-rock theater scene in 16th century London -- the seductive, violent world where his raw talent faced rioting audiences, religious fanatics and raucous side-shows. It’s a contemporary version of Shakespeare's life, played to a modern soundtrack that exposes all his recklessness, lustful temptations and brilliance. 

WATCH SEASON 1 OFFICIAL TRAILER




 CLIP 1. BOUND TO LONDON
 


 WORKSHEET

(reading and listening comprehension activities)










via learnonline

lunes, 26 de junio de 2017

HOW DO YOU PRONOUNCE THAT? PRONUNCIATION LESSONS BY EMMA & LUCY

HOW DO YOU PRONOUNCE THAT? PRONUNCIATION LESSONS BY EMMA & LUCY



While learning to speak English,  pronunciation is probably one of the biggest frustrations we may experience.
But here are two lovely young ladies ready to help us in our journey through awkward combinations of letters and sounds.
Emma and Lucy have many videos on their Youtube channels with useful pronunciation tips. (HERE and HERE)

As a start, try these 2 lessons about the most common English words foreign people tend to mispronounce. How would you pronounce FRUIT? CHAOS? TUESDAY? VEGETABLES? COMFORTABLE? These are just few examples of very common words we foreigners (YES! ME TOO!) tend to pronounce incorrectly. Find out the correct pronunciation in Emma's and Lucy's videos!




martes, 20 de junio de 2017

CUADERNILLO DE PREPARACIÓN POR UNIDADES DE LA PRUEBA EXTRAORDINARIA 1º DE BACHILLERATO (SEPTIEMBRE 2017)

 
CUADERNILLO DE PREPARACIÓN POR UNIDADES DE LA PRUEBA EXTRAORDINARIA 1º DE BACHILLERATO (SEPTIEMBRE 2017)



RECOMENDACIONES: LIBRO DE TEXTO Y CUADERNILLO.

Recomiendo este cuadernillo para preparar la prueba extraordinaria de septiembre además de las siguientes PAUTAS:

1. Repasad el vocabulario, estructuras y gramática de cada unidad justo antes de afrontar este cada unidad de este cuadernillo.
2. Leed el resumen gramatical del final del libro antes de hacer las actividades de cada unidad, así como la lista de vocabulario de la unidad, justo antes de trabajarlas en este cuadernillo.
3. Releed los diálogos y los textos de cada unidad buscando en el diccionario y anotando en vuestro cuaderno las palabras cuyo significado no recordéis.
4.Una vez que terminéis de trabajar este cuadernillo habría que volver a hacer los ejercicios corregidos, tapando las respuestas y comprobando a continuación si se han cometido errores.


OTROS RECURSOS: La web
También podéis estudiar utilizando las páginas web dirigidas a estudiantes de inglés de 1º de bachillerato. El acceso a estas direcciones es gratuito, algunos ejercicios y juegos se pueden imprimir. Para los que no tengáis internet en casa, podéis acceder en las bibliotecas municipales. No obstante, esto es una manera más amena de estudiar lo mismo que tenéis en los libros que hemos utilizado, pero no es imprescindible, aunque sí recomendable. Estas direcciones son útiles tanto para los que tengáis que examinaros en septiembre, como para los que queráis repasar la asignatura de una manera amena y empezar el próximo curso con más tranquilidad.

Recordad que se aprende mucho mejor dedicando un periodo de tiempo no muy largo (una hora, por ejemplo) de forma muy frecuente. Por supuesto, el verano es muy largo: los que tengáis que hacer el examen de septiembre, no dejéis la materia para la semana anterior al examen. Aprovechad para hacer un poco cada día

Trabajad bien, ánimo, que en Septiembre tenéis una gran oportunidad para superar la asignatura. Hay tiempo para descansar y relajarse. Ánimo de nuevo, y suerte.

1ºBACHILLERATO. LIBRO DE TEXTO LOMCE: TRENDS 1

-Ejercicios de repaso .AQUÍ.
-Blog con ejercicios. AQUÍ y en el apartado correspondiente a este nivel de este mismo blog.
-Repaso de toda la gramática de 1º Bachillerato. Bon's Tips. AQUÍ.
-Prácticas de comprensión oral. Listening Practice. AQUÍ.
-Más prácticas de comprensión oral. AQUÍ.



You learn something every day if you pay attention. ~Ray LeBlond

lunes, 12 de junio de 2017

Scorching weather

Image result for heat wave memes

With the weather being the centre of attention and conversations these days, we have the perfect excuse to learn new vocabulary and idioms. Here are some lexical items to use these days!!


‘It’s scorching weather!’
‘I’m boiling!’
‘I’m roasting!’
“What’s The Forecast Like For Tomorrow?”
“Do you know the weather forecast for tomorrow?”
“Looks Like We’re In For A Hot One – They’re Predicting Record Highs This Week.”
“It Sure Is A Scorcher Today.”
‘It’s sticky weather’
‘This room is like an oven today!’
‘The sun is splitting the stones!’
‘It’s so hot you can fry an egg on the stone!
‘We’re currently experiencing a heat wave.
‘I’m sweating like a pig!’
“Looks Like We’re In For A Hot One – They’re Predicting Record Highs This Week.”


Image result for heat wave memes

SPEAKING ACTIVITIES



miércoles, 17 de mayo de 2017

9 Tips To Be A Better Leader - Leadership And Management Skills And Qual...

You learn something every day if you pay attention. ~Ray LeBlond

Business Management : Leadership Skills

You learn something every day if you pay attention. ~Ray LeBlond

Leadership-cartoon

You learn something every day if you pay attention. ~Ray LeBlond

Powerful Learning from This Scene in Invictus: What is Your Philosophy o...

You learn something every day if you pay attention. ~Ray LeBlond

Learn how to manage people and be a better leader

You learn something every day if you pay attention. ~Ray LeBlond

martes, 16 de mayo de 2017

martes, 9 de mayo de 2017

Effects of Stress: TRAINING AND TEAMWORK

You learn something every day if you pay attention. ~Ray LeBlond

TRAINING AND TEAMWORK: Managing Stress - Brainsmart - BBC

You learn something every day if you pay attention. ~Ray LeBlond

TRAINING AND TEAMWORK: Conflict Management (Funny animated)

You learn something every day if you pay attention. ~Ray LeBlond

TRAINING AND TEAM WORK: good teamwork and bad teamwork

You learn something every day if you pay attention. ~Ray LeBlond

miércoles, 3 de mayo de 2017

At the airport - English Basic Communication.

You learn something every day if you pay attention. ~Ray LeBlond

Aeroplane / airplane and airline vocabulary video with pictures

You learn something every day if you pay attention. ~Ray LeBlond

English Vocabulary - Airports

You learn something every day if you pay attention. ~Ray LeBlond

On the Airplane - Travel English Lesson

You learn something every day if you pay attention. ~Ray LeBlond

martes, 18 de abril de 2017

Grammar in Context: THE PASSIVE VOICE (BBC)

Sophie is in China for work and phones home to tell Ollie about her trip.

Instructions

As you watch the video, look at the examples of passive forms. They are in red in the subtitles. Then read the conversation below to learn more. Finally, do the grammar exercises to check you understand, and can use, passive forms correctly.
38
We use the passive, rather than the active, to show that we are more interested in a certain part of the sentence. The passive is usually formed by the verb to be + past participle.
Can you give me some examples of the active and passive?
Yes, of course. Here’s a passive sentence:
My room is being cleaned.
'My room' is the main focus of the sentence. The active form would be 'The cleaners are cleaning my room'. This sounds strange because it is obvious that, if you are in a hotel, cleaners would clean your room. So we sometimes use the passive to avoid stating the obvious.
OK, that makes sense. Are there any other uses?
We also use the passive when we don’t know who did something, or when it isn’t important.
It’s the biggest outdoor elevator in the world, so I’ve been informed.
It doesn’t matter who told me.
I think loads of films have been made there.
The important thing is the films, not the film-makers.
Can you use a passive and also say who did the action?
Yes.
Avatar was made by James Cameron.
Is the passive formal?
No, not necessarily. It can be formal or neutral or informal.
I hope to find everything clean and tidy … you’ve been warned!
But we often avoid the passive in very informal spoken language, for example, by using they.
They based the scenery in Avatar on the landscape here.
We don’t know exactly who they are, but we can guess that it’s the people who made the film.
I think I’ve heard people use you a lot too when they don’t refer to anyone in particular.
Yes, very good! That’s another way of sounding more informal. You is a bit different; it means 'people in general'.
Parcels can be collected from the Post Office between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. (more formal)
You can collect parcels between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. (less formal)
One last question, what about the passive with get? Is that informal too?
Yes, when we’re speaking informally we also often use get rather than the verb be.
He was sacked from his job. = He got sacked from his job.
But be careful, not all verbs can be used in the passive with get - only verbs for talking about an action or a change.
She was knocked off her bike by a bus. = She got knocked off her bike by a bus.
Charlie Chaplin was loved by millions. Charlie Chaplin got loved by millions.
Phew, OK. I think my brain has been fried by all this!
Ah, OK, we’ll stop. But look - you’re using the passive correctly already!

martes, 28 de marzo de 2017

What is Carbon Footprint?

You learn something every day if you pay attention. ~Ray LeBlond

some, any, no, compound forms




SOME, ANY, NO AND COMPOUNDS
 
SOME
 
- IN AFFIRMATIVE SENTENCES:
    I’m going to buy some clothes.
    There’s some ice in the fridge.
    We did some exercises.
 
- Some + plural countable nouns
     I need some new shoes.
 
- Some + uncountable nouns
     I need some money.
 
- IN QUESTIONS, when a Yes/No answer is expected.
     Can I have some coffee?
     Would you like some more meat?
 
 ANY
 
- IN NEGATIVE SENTENCES (used with not) and QUESTIONS (used without not):
 
     I’m not going to buy any clothes.
     There isn’t any orange juice in the fridge.
     Has he got any friends?
 
- IN AFFIRMATIVE sentences with the meaning of every:
 
    You can take any pen.
    Any of them is useful.
 
NO
 
It is used instead of ANY, and the verb always appears in the affirmative form. We use no especially after have (got) and there is / are:
 
No = not + any or not + a
 
    There are no cars in the parking lot.
 
    We’ve got no coffee.
 
    It’s a nice house, but there’s no garden.
 
 
COMPOUNDS
 
 
PEOPLE
Somebody
Someone
Anybody
Anyone
Nobody
No one
THINGS
Something
Anything
Nothing
PLACES
Somewhere
Anywhere
Nowhere
 
 
Use somebody, something, someone, etc. when you don’t say exactly who, what or where.
     Somebody broke the window.
     I went somewhere nice at the weekend.
     She has something in her mouth.
 
 
Use anything, anybody, anywhere, etc. in questions or with a (-) verb.
    I didn’t do anything last night
                     NOT      
           I didn’t do nothing. (x)
 
 
Use nothing, nobody, nowhere, etc. in short negative answers or in a sentence (with an affirmative verb).
 
    Who’s in the bathroom?
    Nobody. Nobody is in the bathroom.
                           NOT      
                    Anybody is in the bathroom. (x)
 
 You can use nobody/ no one/ nothing at the beginning of a sentence or alone (to answer a question)
 
 
SOME, ANY, NO & EVERY COMPOUNDS
 
 
usage
some
1. Afirmative sentences
2. Interrogative sentences when they mean
    invitation or when an affirmative answer
    is expected
someone
somebody
something
somewhere
any
1. Interrogative sentences
2. Negative sentences (to have a negative
    meaning “any” has to follow “not”)
3. Affirmative sentences meaning “every”
anyone
anybody
anything
anywhere
no

1. Affirmative or interrogative sentences,
    to which they confer a negative meaning.
2. Mainly used as subjects.
no one
nobody
nothing
none
nowhere
every
 
 
Affirmative, negative or interrogative sentences
everyone
everybody
everything
everywhere