martes, 28 de marzo de 2017

some, any, no, compound forms




SOME, ANY, NO AND COMPOUNDS
 
SOME
 
- IN AFFIRMATIVE SENTENCES:
    I’m going to buy some clothes.
    There’s some ice in the fridge.
    We did some exercises.
 
- Some + plural countable nouns
     I need some new shoes.
 
- Some + uncountable nouns
     I need some money.
 
- IN QUESTIONS, when a Yes/No answer is expected.
     Can I have some coffee?
     Would you like some more meat?
 
 ANY
 
- IN NEGATIVE SENTENCES (used with not) and QUESTIONS (used without not):
 
     I’m not going to buy any clothes.
     There isn’t any orange juice in the fridge.
     Has he got any friends?
 
- IN AFFIRMATIVE sentences with the meaning of every:
 
    You can take any pen.
    Any of them is useful.
 
NO
 
It is used instead of ANY, and the verb always appears in the affirmative form. We use no especially after have (got) and there is / are:
 
No = not + any or not + a
 
    There are no cars in the parking lot.
 
    We’ve got no coffee.
 
    It’s a nice house, but there’s no garden.
 
 
COMPOUNDS
 
 
PEOPLE
Somebody
Someone
Anybody
Anyone
Nobody
No one
THINGS
Something
Anything
Nothing
PLACES
Somewhere
Anywhere
Nowhere
 
 
Use somebody, something, someone, etc. when you don’t say exactly who, what or where.
     Somebody broke the window.
     I went somewhere nice at the weekend.
     She has something in her mouth.
 
 
Use anything, anybody, anywhere, etc. in questions or with a (-) verb.
    I didn’t do anything last night
                     NOT      
           I didn’t do nothing. (x)
 
 
Use nothing, nobody, nowhere, etc. in short negative answers or in a sentence (with an affirmative verb).
 
    Who’s in the bathroom?
    Nobody. Nobody is in the bathroom.
                           NOT      
                    Anybody is in the bathroom. (x)
 
 You can use nobody/ no one/ nothing at the beginning of a sentence or alone (to answer a question)
 
 
SOME, ANY, NO & EVERY COMPOUNDS
 
 
usage
some
1. Afirmative sentences
2. Interrogative sentences when they mean
    invitation or when an affirmative answer
    is expected
someone
somebody
something
somewhere
any
1. Interrogative sentences
2. Negative sentences (to have a negative
    meaning “any” has to follow “not”)
3. Affirmative sentences meaning “every”
anyone
anybody
anything
anywhere
no

1. Affirmative or interrogative sentences,
    to which they confer a negative meaning.
2. Mainly used as subjects.
no one
nobody
nothing
none
nowhere
every
 
 
Affirmative, negative or interrogative sentences
everyone
everybody
everything
everywhere